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Frequently Asked Questions: Theatre Exile’s 2021/22 Season

As we welcome audiences back for our 2021-22 season, Theatre Exile remains committed to providing our patrons with quality and provocative productions highlighting important themes and stories. Our hope is that we can bring our patrons back together in our theater as we celebrate Theatre Exile’s 25th anniversary season.

We hope this page can help answer some of the frequently asked questions we’ve received from patrons regarding our upcoming season.

Thank you for your continued support!

Q: I’m still concerned about gathering in public spaces. How will Theatre Exile address the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic?

A: Theatre Exile continues to prioritize the health and safety of our patrons, staff, cast, and crew. For the current season, we will be adopting the following protocols for all indoor productions:

  1. Masks will be mandatory for patrons, staff, and crew.
  2. Audience members will be required to present proof of vaccination.
  3. All staff, artists, and crew present will be vaccinated.
  4. Theatre Exile will limit our indoor capacity to provide distanced seating.
  5. Theatre Exile will conduct regular cleanings before every indoor performance.

These policies are subject to change based on the recommendations from the CDC and local restrictions. To keep up with the latest news regarding our COVID protocols, please visit theatreexile.org/safety or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Q: Will audiences be able to bring food or drink into the theater?

A: No, audiences are prohibited from bringing food and drink to Theatre Exile’s indoor performances. Additionally, we will not be selling concessions in our building throughout the 2021-22 season. 

Q: How can I purchase subscriptions or tickets to Theatre Exile’s upcoming productions?

A: Subscription and ticket purchases, gift certificates and tax-deductible donations may be made securely online or by calling 215-218-4022. Please reach out to the Theatre Exile box office (boxoffice@theatreexile.org) for group sales inquiries.

For more information about Theatre Exile’s ticketing procedures and policies, please click HERE

Q: Will Theatre Exile’s box office be available for in-person transactions?

A: No, the physical Theatre Exile box office is unavailable for in-person transactions, but our staff is standing by to assist you! You can email boxoffice@theatreexile.org or call 215-218-4022 with questions about subscriptions, tickets and events.

Q: What is Theatre Exile’s season subscription? 

A: A subscription to the 2021-22 season guarantees you have access to Exile’s productions for an affordable price. Experience three new plays that stimulate conversations, made with the bare-knuckled acting, imaginative designs, and bold direction you’ve come to expect from Theatre Exile. 

A reminder that subscribers will be able to select show dates prior to each show or once individual tickets go on sale for their subscriptions this season.  Patrons will be notified when they can select performances for each show, at which point subscribers can use their tickets in any way within their subscription plan. You could even use all three of your tickets provided by the subscription on one show.

Feel free to send an email to boxoffice@theatreexile.org or give us a call at (215) 218-4022 to inquire about selecting your subscription dates.

Q: What does a subscription guarantee me?

A: A Flex-Pass Subscription guarantees you:

  • 3 tickets to redeem throughout the 2021-22 season
  • Priority seating for shows presented in the theater
  • 20% off any additional tickets
  • Easy ticket exchanges
  • Flexibility: It’s your plan, it’s your choice

Purchase your 2021-22 season subscription by clicking HERE.

Q: How much are the 2021/22 subscription plan prices? What do they include?
A:
Here’s the 2021/22 subscription plans:

Preview Plan | $45
Tickets to any preview performances

Weekday Plan | $85
Tickets to any weekday performance (excluding Opening Nights)
No upgrade fee to attend preview performance

Weekend Plan | $95
Tickets to any weekend performance (excluding Opening Nights)
No upgrade fee to attend preview performance

Opening Night Plan | $125
Tickets to Opening Night of each production
No upgrade fee to attend any other performance
Invitation to special Opening Night events

Purchase your 2021-22 season subscription by clicking HERE.

Q: Will there be any additional ticketing fees?
A: No, Theatre Exile has eliminated any additional fees for this season’s ticketing and subscription sales.

Q: What shows are available through the 2021/22 subscription plans?
A: Here are the upcoming shows that Theatre Exile is presenting this year:

*World Premiere*
Extreme Home Makeover
By Makasha Copeland
October 28 – November 21, 2021 | Venue: Theatre Exile
Opening Night: November 3, 2021 at 8 p.m.

The Motherfucker with the Hat
By Stephen Adly Guirgis
February 3 – 27, 2021 | Venue: Theatre Exile
Opening Night: February 9, 2021 at 8 p.m.

Today is My Birthday
By Susan Soon He Stanton
Directed by Cat Ramirez
April 28 – May 22, 2021 | Venue: Theatre Exile
Opening Night: May 4, 2021 at 8 p.m.

Q: I’m interested in supporting Theatre Exile. What are some of the ways patrons can donate?

A: We appreciate our amazing community’s ongoing support over the past 25 years. We could not have accomplished so much – main stage performances, new play development, world premieres, free educational programs, free outdoor performances, and more – without the generosity of so many individuals, corporations and organizations. 

We offer a number of ways for our supporters to donate by mail, online, phone, and more! Visit our Donate page to find out how you can send a tax-deductible donation.

Q: I’m a professional actor interested in auditioning for Theatre Exile’s upcoming season. Will Theatre Exile be conducting auditions or accepting submissions?

A: Theatre Exile operates under a Small Professional Theatre agreement with Actors’ Equity Association, and in accordance with that agreement, we hold multiple open call auditions each season. We make a concerted effort to cast from a diverse pool of actors in the Philadelphia professional acting community. Most auditions are by appointment. Check back here for more information about upcoming open auditions.

If you are unable to attend auditions and wish to be kept on file, please fill out this form.

Questions can be sent to our Artistic Department at artistic@theatreexile.org.For more information regarding casting & submissions, please click HERE.

Frequently Asked Questions: ‘Pass Over’ by Antoinette Nwandu

Theatre Exile’s 2020/21 season looks different this year, but our commitment to quality and provocative productions highlighting important themes and stories has not changed. Neither is our commitment to the audience experience. 

We hope that this page can help answer questions for our upcoming outdoor production of Pass Over by Antoinette Nwandu.

Thanks for your support. Enjoy Pass Over

Pass Over is an outdoor production. What does this mean?

We have partnered with the Theatre in the X and Brothers Network to present a theatrical production of Pass Over at Hawthorne Park (12th & Catharine St). Each show will be performed for an audience of 75 people (maximum) throughout its 14-date run. To ensure the best possible experience, Theatre Exile will have a group of volunteers available to assist patrons and ensure proper social distancing.

Due to city ordinance, we are prohibited from selling tickets on-site, so all patrons must purchase their tickets in advance and bring a printed or digital copy of their ticket(s) with them to the show. Face masks must be worn upon arrival/ticket check-in.

What are recommendations for parking or traveling to Hawthorne Park (12th & Catharine St)?

Here is a list of parking available to guests attending Theatre Exile and Theatre in the X’s upcoming outdoor production of Pass Over at Hawthorne Park:

Alternatives:

  • The 45 bus route (Broad – Oregon Ave) stops at 12th & Catharine St.
  • Hawthorne Park is an 8-minute walk from the Lombard – South St Subway Stop on the Broad Street Line.
  • Indego Bike Drop-off Locations at:
    • Broad & Christian St
    • Broad & Carpenter St
    • 11th & South Street
    • 11th & Washington Ave
    • Darien & Catharine St

How long is the show?

This production of Pass Over has an 80-minute run time. 

What will seating be like?

The show takes place in a green park. The majority of the seating will be on the grass. We will provide blankets and chairs so that we can ensure social distancing between our audience members and between our audience and the performers. We will be allowing guests to arrive and arrange their seating 45 minutes before the start of each show. Please let us know if you have any accessibility needs.

Will there be additional accommodations for guests? 

Yes. To further enhance the show’s quality, audiences attending the 80-minute production will be given wireless headphones to use that will capture the expansive audio soundscape. The headphones have two dials to adjust the volume and reception channel. Guests will be informed of the correct channel to set their headphones before the show begins. Each pair of headphones must be returned and will be sanitized after each performance.

Can guests bring their own food or drinks? Will there be refreshments available at Hawthorne Park?

Theatre Exile will not be selling or distributing food or drinks at Hawthorne Park. Guests may bring food or drinks if they choose but drinking alcohol in open containers is prohibited. 

Can attendees bring their own seating?
Guests are invited to bring blankets or chairs for the lawn and set up their seating 45 minutes before the show starts.

Is the show ADA accessible? 

Hawthorne Park is ADA accessible. If you need further accommodations, please contact the box office (boxoffice@theatreexile.org) after you’ve purchased tickets. Additionally, an American Sign Language interpreter will translate Pass Over for the Friday, June 25 performance. 

Is Pass Over appropriate for all ages?

Pass Over contains frequent and extreme profanity, loud gunshots, and flashing lights, and is intended for mature audiences. Viewer discretion is advised.

Will there be refunds if a show is canceled due to weather?

Performance cancelations due to inclement weather or other circumstances are very rare. If a performance must be canceled, we will get in touch with you to make arrangements for an alternate performance date within the run. Audience members will be alerted about cancellations with at least three (3) hours’ notice.

Please note: Theatre Exile does not offer refunds after a performance has taken place. 

Will there be a show playbill to read?

Yes, there will be printed playbills handed out to attendees before each show.

Who can I contact if I need assistance before or during the performance?

For any questions or concerns before the show, please email boxoffice@theatreexile.org. During the performance, there will be volunteers available on-site to assist you with any needs or issues. 






Frequently Asked Questions: ‘Zoo Motel’ by Thaddeus Phillips

Theatre Exile’s 2020/21 season looks different this year, but our commitment to quality and provocative productions that highlight important themes and stories has not changed. Neither is our commitment to the audience experience. 

We hope that this page can help you navigate the streamed show.  

The basics: We will email you a link, you click, and you enjoy the show!

Thanks for your support. Enjoy Zoo Motel!


Zoo Motel is a virtual performance. Is it pre-recorded? How can I watch it?

No, Zoo Motel is not pre-recorded. It is an interactive virtual event featuring live performances that is performed entirely over Zoom for a maximum of 25 audience members. Only one ticket is needed per household. 

The show first debuted in the fall of 2020 as a quarantined experiment that allows audiences from around the world to watch this engaging production at the same time from the comfort of their own homes.

What if I don’t want to turn my camera on during the show?

Audience participants are not required to turn their Zoom camera on during the show; however, we recommend that you turn on your camera to get the most out of the interactive portions of the show and enjoy the complete experience.

How and when will I receive my virtual tickets to view Zoo Motel?

Once you purchase your virtual ticket for a Zoo Motel performance, you will receive a confirmation email from us with your order summary (NOTE: Please make sure you have entered a valid e-mail address before confirming your purchase).

You will receive a separate email within 72 hours which will include a Zoom link to access the performance, your “room key,” and some additional details needed for checking into the Zoo Motel

For any questions or concerns, please email boxoffice@theatreexile.org ahead of the show and checkin@zoomotel.org once the show begins.

I’m a subscriber. Can I use one of my subscriber tickets for this show? 

No, this special presentation of Zoo Motel is not included in our 2020-2021 subscription series. However, current subscribers are welcome to apply their 20% subscriber discount to their ticket order. Please email boxoffice@theatreexile.org for more information.

Do I need to watch Zoo Motel at a specific date and time?

Yes. When you purchase a ticket for a specific performance, the Zoom link you receive via email will only work for your selected performance date/time. Please enter a valid email address, because it’s the only way we can send the materials you’ll need to access the show.

Is there an on-demand video option for Zoo Motel?

No, Zoo Motel will not have an on-demand video option due to the fact that it is a live performance that takes place entirely over Zoom.

Can more than one person watch Zoo Motel with one ticket?

Yes. Each virtual ticket will provide a Zoom link to view the show. Each link is good for one household viewing on one screen. You can have as many people as you’d like watching on one device; however, link-sharing is not permitted. 

Zoo Motel is a unique experience based on the number of patrons who have purchased a ticket for each performance.

How can I watch Zoo Motel on my devices?

Zoo Motel can be viewed on your laptop computer, desktop or tablet. You can maximize your screen size and enjoy a comfortable setting to enjoy the show. 

Note: For best-viewing quality, position our computer close to your wireless router and minimize the number of household devices using the internet. A slower internet connection may impact video quality.

Here are some resources to help you cast Zoo Motel on your TV:

Streaming using Chromecast

Streaming using Amazon Firestick

Note: Zoom is not compatible with Smart TVs or Roku. If you do not have a Chromecast or Firestick, we advise you connect your computer directly to your TV with an HDMI cable.

Will there be a show playbill to read?

Yes, we have a digital version of our playbill available in PDF form for easy viewing. You will receive a link to the playbill in your pre-show email before your selected performance.

Who can I contact if I need assistance before or during the performance?

For any questions or concerns, please email boxoffice@theatreexile.org ahead of the show and checkin@zoomotel.org once the show begins.









Our interview with Matt Pfeiffer, director of ‘Sin Eaters’

Q: How did you approach adapting Sin Eaters as a virtual production? What were some of the themes that you were able to highlight through this medium as opposed to an onstage production?  
Well, since so much of the play is about screen time and what it can do to your perception of reality, I definitely think our approach is a commentary on those themes. On stage, you’d be able to engage with the intellectual idea, but people will watch this through the very medium that is under scrutiny in the play. There’s also a lot about voyeurism. The way we’ve staged it digitally is intended as a meta-commentary on voyeurism.


Q: How connected would you say you are to social media in your day-to-day life? Has working on Sin Eaters altered your opinion in any way? 
Like most people, I’m way too connected to social media. I spend way too much time looking at my phone, just scrolling through nonsense. Working on the play has definitely reminded me of all the ways in which my perception of reality has been greatly altered by social media. 


Q: What advice would you give another director who was adapting to online directing?  

I was eager to create a circumstance that allowed the actors to play the play without interruption. In most cases that was true. It wasn’t until we had to do re-shoots, that the process wasn’t true theater. I would say that you should think quite a bit about what the point of view of the camera actually is. In the theater it’s a fairly intuitive process, we are aware of our relationship to the stage from the audience. In moving to a digital platform, you have to reconsider what the relationship between the play and the audience can be. What’s the audience’s relationship with the camera? And I think you have to try and make the camera character. 


Q: What was it like collaborating with the two co-stars, Bi Jean Ngo and David M Raine? Did their real-life relationship help inform how they approached their characters’ relationship “onstage”? 

They are both supremely talented actors. But their familiarity and comfortability with each other definitely added a layer of verisimilitude. The relationship of the characters is different from their actual relationship, but the dilemmas and tensions that face all couples are still available to draw upon.  


Q: What would you like the audience to take away from Sin Eaters

I’m always a little afraid of this question. I don’t want to be didactic about what the experience should be. I certainly think the play raises great questions about how we perceive the world when our main source of engagement is our phone. Or on line. In this pandemic, that has increased. We can’t seem to agree on basic information and truths. And, clearly, there’s a disturbing number of people who are inclined to see conspiracy and be galvanized to unshakable conviction by untruths. But when you silo yourself off and seek only confirmation for your perceptions, that’s where you can end up. The play, through a sort of Twilight Zone/Black Mirror lens, gets at that idea, metaphorically speaking. I hope that’s what the audience engages with. 






Our interview with Anna Moench, playwright behind ‘Sin Eaters’

Q: Mary Lee, the main character of Sin Eaters, plays a content moderator for a fictitious social media company. What was your early inspiration for the show and how did you go about researching the topics presented in it?

I learned about the existence of content moderators a decade ago, and found it fascinating. I wanted to write about it, but didn’t have an access point at the time (or so I thought) since I didn’t work in tech. As it turned out, I didn’t realize how deeply unhappy I was in my day job at the time, a job in an industry that has legal but unethical practices. I thought that I could make decent money and continue writing. But of course, anything we spend the majority of our waking hours doing has an effect on us. I became more irritable, more selfish, angrier… there came a moment when I realized I was turning into someone I didn’t like. I ended up leaving that job and changing a lot of things in my life, and that’s when I realized how I could write Sin Eaters. It’s about content moderation and social media, but it’s also about working a job that takes something from you, and you’re willing to give that piece of yourself in exchange for a paycheck. The research was pretty straightforward when it came to the nuts and bolts of content moderation, there’s a lot of great reporting out there that helped me understand this profession. But I was laying my own personal experience over that research and that’s what made it possible for me to write this play at last.


Q: The subject of content moderation has become a major and very public issue for social media platforms in the last few months alone. Has your perspective on ‘Sin Eaters’ changed at all in wake of recent events? 

I wrote this play in 2015. I wish the events of 2016-2021 had proven this play wrong, but that hasn’t happened. This is a problem that won’t go away easily. Banning disinformation and Nazis is a start, so maybe we’re on the right path, we’ll see.


Q: The way you wrote the script for Sin Eaters makes it feel as though one moment fades directly into the next, further blurring the lines between Mary Lee’s personal and work life. How do you personally relate to that experience? What message did you want to send the audience? 
 
That’s how it feels when you’re stuck in that cycle. You wake up in a crappy apartment that exhausts you, go to a crappy job that exhausts you, go home to your crappy apartment that exhausts you, get a fitful night of sleep, and do it all over again the next day. I love it when the formal container of the play is a storytelling device in and of itself, whether that is an emotional experience, a physical one, etc.


Q: It’s been a difficult year for live entertainment and performers around the world. How have you used your time during quarantine and what lessons would you share with aspiring playwrights during this time?

I didn’t expect how hard it would be to write plays during this time, but that’s been my experience. I feel a strong need to be hearing the heartbeat of theater in order to write plays, just knowing that productions are happening out there, going to see them and thinking, “Wow, how did they do that? What do I have in response to this?”, friends in rehearsals, hearing how someone’s tech is going, all of that. And of course, it’s incredibly sad that an artistic industry that was already so financially strapped is unable to function for well over a year. It’s difficult to write plays now because I don’t know what the world is going to look like when they’re produced, and it is so bizarre to have a conversation with people in a completely unknown reality. I guess that’s always the case to some extent, but in my own life I haven’t experienced such a rapid pace of change and enormous societal upheaval before. I have no brilliant advice. Write if you can. Don’t beat yourself up if you can’t. Trust that there will be a time when you can again, and in the meantime just pay attention to what’s happening around you, I guess. That’s what I’m trying to do.


Q: What would you like the audience to take away from Sin Eaters?

On one level, this is a play about the permeability of our souls. Most of us know what it’s like to work a job that is destroying you on the inside and realizing it too late. So on that level,  we’re Mary. But on another level, we are the unseen users of the company that employs her, and I hope the play makes people consider that as well. Some of us can outsource the dirty work of our lives, and we’ve gotten really good at obscuring and forgetting the fact that real people are the ones who do that dirty work. There’s human labor behind so many of the things that seem automated, whether that’s a social media feed or same-day delivery or a $5 t-shirt. I would love for more people to lift the rock and look underneath once in a while. To see who is doing the work to make your life easier, and to demand that they are given a safe workplace and equitable pay. There is a reason companies want to make things seem magical to the consumer.







Frequently Asked Questions: ‘Sin Eaters’ by Anna Moench

Theatre Exile’s 2020/21 season looks different this year, but our commitment to quality and provocative productions that highlight important themes and stories has not changed. Neither is our commitment to the audience experience. 

We hope that this page can help you navigate the streamed show.  

The basics: We will email you a link, you click, and you enjoy the show!

Thanks for your support. Enjoy Sin Eaters!


Sin Eaters is a virtual performance. What does that mean?

While the current pandemic prevents us from welcoming audiences into our new theater to view plays, we have continued our work to produce impactful works in Theatre Exile’s traditional style. Knowing that our shows would need to be streamed online, we selected Sin Eaters as an ideal script that would be relevant and successful as an online production. Our cast and crew followed our standard production and rehearsal processes and we adopted new technologies so that the two actors could rehearse and perform from their homes. While Sin Eaters is viewed on a screen rather than a stage, the production features the quality acting, set and sound design, original music, and powerful delivery that Exile audiences expect. 

Is Sin Eaters a Zoom performance?

Sin Eaters is not created for or delivered over Zoom. Sin Eaters is filmed with professional-grade video and audio equipment and has been expertly mastered for high-quality video and sound delivery and is streamed through the Patron Manager application. 

How and when will I receive my virtual tickets to view Sin Eaters?

Once you purchase your virtual ticket for a Sin Eaters performance, you will receive a confirmation email from us with your order summary and ticket link (NOTE: Please make sure you have entered a valid e-mail address before confirming your purchase).

The day before your selected performance date, you will receive a pre-show email from us with your ticket link to view the show as well as a link to our virtual playbill, which you can view or print. The ticket link will be highlighted in a BLUE BOX within both emails. Simply click on the blue box to see the show. If you need assistance, please email boxoffice@theatreexile.org.

If you are a subscriber, simply send an email to boxoffice@theatreexile.org with your desired performance dates and you will receive your ticket confirmation email within 24 hours. Please note that all tickets will automatically be sent to the email address on the ticket order.

Do I need to watch Sin Eaters at a specific date and time, or it is available on-demand?

When you purchase a ticket for a specific performance, the link you receive via email will only work for your selected performance date/time. Again, we advise entering a valid email address to receive your e-tickets so your tickets are delivered in a timely manner.

Can more than one person watch Sin Eaters with one ticket?

Each virtual ticket is good for one household viewing on one screen. Unfortunately, the link will not work if someone outside your household attempts to click the same link. If you would like to watch the show with friends and family outside of your household, we recommend that you purchase additional tickets for those households and forward those ticket links directly to them. However, viewers will be able to change platforms during the show if needed (e.g. switching from your phone to a tablet).

Content Warning: Please note that Sin Eaters contains references to violence, threatening and misogynistic language, and sexual assault. The content may not be suitable for younger audiences.

How can I watch Sin Eaters on my devices?

Sin Eaters can be viewed on your smart TV, laptop computer, desktop computer, or tablet. You can maximize your screen size and enjoy a comfortable setting to enjoy the show

Note: For best viewing quality, position our computer close to your wireless router and minimize the number of household devices using the internet. A slower internet connection may impact video quality.

Here are some resources to help you stream Sin Eaters on your smart TV:

Streaming from iPhone to Apple TV or smart TV

Streaming from Android Phone to smart TV

Streaming using Chromecast

Streaming with Roku

Will there be a show playbill to read?

Yes, we have a digital version of our playbill available in PDF form for easy viewing.  You will receive a link to the playbill in your pre-show email the day before your selected performance.

Who can I contact if I need assistance before or during the performance?

Theatre Exile staff will be available during regular weekday business hours (M-F, 10am-5pm), as well as one hour before showtime through the end of each performance to answer any questions. Simply email us at boxoffice@theatreexile.org.

Is there an on-demand video option for Sin Eaters?

Yes, new for this production, there is an on-demand option that allows you to watch Sin Eaters based on your schedule. When you purchase the video on-demand ticket, your show link will be valid for 48 hours from the time it is first viewed, not purchased. If you purchase today, your will begin when you first view the show.

You will be able to access your ticket link beginning on February 11. The show must be viewed by Sunday, February 28.

** Please note that when you purchase Video On-Demand tickets, you will not receive an email with a link to the digital version of the Sin Eaters playbill. You can view or download the Sin Eaters playbill here.

Frequently Asked Questions: D-Pad by Jeremy Gable

Theatre Exile’s 2020/21 season looks different this year, but our commitment to quality and provocative productions that highlight important themes and stories has not changed. Neither is our commitment to the audience experience. We hope that this page can help you navigate the streamed show.

The basics: We will email you a link, you click, and you enjoy the show!

Thanks for your support. Enjoy D-Pad!


D-Pad is a virtual performance? What does that mean?

While the current pandemic prevents us from welcoming audiences into our new theater to view plays, we have continued our work to produce impactful works in Theatre Exile’s traditional style. Knowing that our first two shows would need to be streamed online, we selected D-Pad as an ideal script that would be relevant and successful as an online production. Playwright Jeremy Gable worked with Theatre Exile to adapt his script and create a specific version of D-Pad for virtual performance. 

Our cast and crew followed our standard production and rehearsal processes and we adopted new technologies so that the four actors could rehearse and perform from their homes. While D-Pad is viewed on a screen rather than a stage, the production features the quality acting, set and sound design, original music, and powerful delivery that Exile audiences expect.  

Is D-Pad a Zoom performance?

D-Pad is not created for or delivered over Zoom. D-Pad was filmed with new, professional-grade video and audio equipment and enhanced with custom-designed green screen technology and visual effects. The show has been expertly mastered for high quality video and sound delivery and is streamed through the Patron Manager application. D-Pad is not like any virtual performance you may have experienced this year.

What makes D-Pad different than the other online programs I have watched?

Playwright Jeremy Gable adapted his D-Pad script specifically for Theatre Exile’s streamed production. The entire script was modified for our online environment, and the technology and design elements were created for this production. D-Pad is a story about people who live and communicate in the online space, which makes it an ideal selection for this online show.

How and when will I receive my virtual tickets to view D-Pad?

Once you purchase your virtual ticket for a D-Pad performance, you will receive a confirmation email from us with your order summary and ticket link. The day before your selected performance date, you will receive a pre-show email from us with your ticket link to view the show and well as a link to our virtual playbill, which you can view or print. The ticket link will be highlighted in a BLUE BOX within both emails. Simply click on the blue box to see the show. If you need assistance, please email boxoffice@theatreexile.org.

If you are a subscriber, simply send an email to boxoffice@theatreexile.org with your desired performance dates and you will receive your ticket confirmation email within 24 hours. Please note that all virtual tickets will automatically be sent to the email address on the ticket order.

Do I need to watch D-Pad at a specific date and time, or it is available on demand?

When you purchase a ticket for a specific performance, the link you receive via email will only work for your selected performance date/time. We have scheduled D-Pad shows similar to all Theatre Exile seasons, but we have added some additional times to enable new audiences from across the country to view the productions.

Can more than one person watch D-Pad with one ticket?

Each virtual ticket is good for one household viewing on one screen. Unfortunately, the link will not work if someone outside of your household attempts to click the same link. If you would like to watch the show with friends and family outside of your household, we recommend that you purchase additional tickets for those households and forward those ticket links directly to them.

Please note that D-Pad contains scenes with threatening and misogynistic language, digitized war violence, and police aggression. The content may not be suitable for younger audiences.

How can I watch D-Pad on my devices?

D-Pad can be viewed on your smart TV, laptop computer, desktop computer, or tablet. You can maximize your screen size and enjoy a comfortable setting to enjoy the show.

Note: For best viewing quality, locate your computer close to your wireless router and minimize the number of household devices using the internet. Slower internet connection may impact the video quality.

Here are some resources to help you stream D-Pad on your smart TV:

Streaming from iPhone to Apple TV or smart TV

Streaming from Android Phone to smart TV

Streaming using Chromecast

Streaming with Roku

Will there be a show playbill to read?

Yes, we have a digital version of our program available in a PDF form for easy viewing.  You will receive a link to the program in your pre-show email the day before your selected performance.  You can also download and view the program here.

Who can I contact if I need assistance before or during the performance?

Theatre Exile staff will be available during regular weekday business hours (M-F, 10am-5pm), as well as one hour before showtime through the end of each performance to answer any questions. Simply email us at boxoffice@theatreexile.org.

Our interview with TS Hawkins, Theatre Exile’s New Education Director

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I’m an international author, performance poet, art activist, educator, and playwright who enjoys finding free moments to curl up with a good hardcovered tome and a glass of happiness!

Q: What previous roles have you held at Theatre Exile? 

A: I have been with Theatre Exile for seven (7) years working in the box office, front of house, and as a teaching artist for the Out of Exile residency.

Q: What drew you to work with Theatre Exile?  

A: [Producing Artistic Director] Deb Block was my college professor (way back in the day, lol). But around 2013, I saw Exile’s posting for additional box office assistants on the Theatre Philadelphia Listserv. Having past box office experience, I threw my credentials in the ring. After a preliminary phone interview, I was called in for a follow-up meeting. To my surprise, Deb was in the office that day and decided to join the interview. It felt like a mini family reunion, and the rest is history!

Q: What made you stick around?

A: I’m still with Theatre Exile because of Deb’s vision for the organization. Understanding there are structures that need to shift in order for Exile to thrive to its fullest potential, Deb continues to make sure the magic created on and off the stage is equitable, brave, and accountable to the communities we serve.

Q: What is your new position at Theatre Exile? What are you most excited about in this position? 

A: Now, serving as the new Education Director, I’m elated to work with the young voices in our Paper Wings program and connecting with new community members and activists for our workshops.

Q: What do you find most rewarding about your new position so far?

A: In stepping into this position, I enjoy engaging with the staff in a newly rejuvenated way. It’s exciting to manifest a creative brain trust with this group of folks!

Q: Tell us about your upcoming Workshop Reading on October 23 during the 5th Annual Bridge PHL Theatre Festival.

A: They’ll Neglect to Tell You began as a five-minute vignette I curated in 2015 for the Painted Bride Arts Center’s Souls of Black Folk Project. In 2019, I was accepted into the 1812 Productions Jilline Ringle Solo Residency, where I partnered with Lois Moses to dive deeper and expand the solo vignette.

It was during the residency feedback session that I was gifted a wonderous question: “Do you feel like there are more voices in this work?” Not having an immediate answer, I sat with the work months after the residency concluded. It was then that the distinct character voices rang clear, and, once more, the work transcended. It is an honor to showcase the new developments of They’ll Neglect to Tell You during the 5th Annual Bridge PHL Theatre Festival (virtual).

They’ll Neglect to Tell You tells the story of Grace and Merci — Grace is a burgeoning therapist, and Merci dangles for freedom at the bottom of a bourbon glass. College sweethearts and newlyweds, they elope to Philadelphia for a fresh beginning. Stumbling into polarizing landscapes, they struggle in the margins of heart and home. They’ll Neglect to Tell You asks the question, “When ‘heart and home’ are gentrified, can one truly feel safe and sound?”  Admission is FREE with RSVP!  

The Creative Team: Lois Moses (Director); Betsy Vivar (Grace) and Cynda Purnell (Merci)  

Our interview with former Theatre Exile Education Director, Steve Gravelle

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I’m Steve Gravelle. I’m an educator, a writer, a cook, and a carpenter. I love to ride my bike around Philadelphia and the area, I’ve seen every Marvel movie in the theater, and I make the world’s best macaroni and cheese. I’m originally from New Hampshire, but I’ve lived in Philly since 2006. 

Q: What was your role at Theatre Exile? How long did you work there, and what was your favorite part of the job? 

A: When I left Theatre Exile, I was the Education Director, but I had previously been Education Coordinator and Master Carpenter. I worked there from 2012-2020. My favorite part of the job was exactly what I’ve taken into my new life: working with young people. I loved teaching students how to write and perform their own work, to tell their stories, and to discover that they could all write and perform original works of theater, even if they didn’t think so at first.  

Q: What was the most rewarding part of your position?  

A: To witness the growth in my students. To see them develop their own unique voices, push through obstacles in the creation process, and learn the kind of skills that theater so perfectly teaches: collaboration, self-confidence, public speaking skills, and determination. Many students I worked with over the years had no interest in theater when we started but ended up really loving the process and the end product!

Q: Tell us about the Paper Wings program and the value it brings to the community.

A: Paper Wings is a really special program. A professional teaching artist visits each classroom about once a week, working with the students to help them write and perform original monologues and plays. Every student is challenged to write something that only they could write… I pushed students every week to instill a clear sense of their unique selves into their work, always bringing it back to that essential question: why is this something only you could write?

Most of the work wasn’t autobiographical, but featured characters based on people they knew, some emotional realities of their lives, and even small parts of themselves that made the work truly their own. The value to the community consists of building up every student that Paper Wings works with, teaching them writing and performance skills, but also helping them to grow as artists and people, and to leave the program with increased confidence that they take into every part of their lives.  

Q: What new opportunities are you pursuing since leaving Exile? 

A: I recently made the transition from teaching artistry to seeking my master’s degree in education from the Relay Graduate School of Education. This year, I’m a teacher resident at Frankford High School, which means I’m co-teaching senior English with a veteran teacher while I take grad school classes at night. Then I’ll have one year as a solo classroom teacher while finishing my M.E.  My new life is a lot of work, but I really love it so far!

Our interview with Theatre Exile External Relations Associate, Kyleen Goode

Q. Tell us about yourself.

A. I was born in the Bronx, and my family moved to New Jersey when I was still pretty young. I’m still a Jersey girl even after all of these years in Philly. I moved to Philly to attend Temple University and have a very long-winded degree in Broadcasting, Telecommunications & Mass Media. I’ve heard that they’ve finally shortened that name. Go Owls!

At one point I was really interested in being a TV host/personality, but my passion has always been in music. So, while I was studying at Temple, I also took quite a few music classes. 

Q. What’s your role at Theatre Exile? How long you have been there, and what’s favorite part of the job.

A. My title at Theatre Exile is External Relations Associate, and I have been managing relationships with our patrons since October 2018. It’s actually my first job working behind the scenes at a theater company, and I’ve learned a ton.

What I love most about my role is being able to create systems to actively and effectively communicate with our patrons. I’ve always loved connecting with people — that seems to be the common denominator in all of the jobs I’ve had.

Q. Tell us about your current performing work. Where you would like to see your path take you?

A. While I was singing Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey into my karaoke machine growing up, I definitely thought the dream was to get “signed” as an R&B singer. Ha! I went to a performing arts high school for part of the day during my senior year and was introduced to musical theater.

I loved it, but wasn’t really interested in singing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from “Carousel” as a black girl. I didn’t see myself fitting into that world, so I had my own band for a while and got a little tired of managing musicians. After that, I started auditioning for theater productions in Pennsylvania and rekindled my love for musical theater.

Today, I’m still in love with musical theater and have thoroughly enjoyed the work I’ve done with 11th Hour, City Theatre Company, the Arden, the Eagle, and more. But I want to see more diversity in musical theater offerings in Philly.

There are so many more stories to share here, and I’d love to be a part of that as a woman of color. But, on the flip side, I also look forward to performing on stages all over the world. That excites me, too.

Q. What are some of your passions, hobbies, or causes?

A. Thanks to COVID-19, I’ve just discovered how much I enjoy cooking new recipes. I’m amping up my baking skills, so that’s fun! Otherwise, I’m incredibly passionate about supporting the talents of artists of color. Sometimes I think about starting a performing arts program for young brown girls, but I haven’t tackled that one yet.

Q. How do you describe Theatre Exile compared to other theater companies?

A. I’d say Exile is the theatre company that produces plays that really gets people talking. Our shows usually battle with a conflict of emotions, and it’s pretty cool to see how people sort that out amongst themselves when the show is over.

That’s what theater is supposed to do.